Crucial Elements to Include on Your Sales Page

by Kristen Burgess
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Here is a quick rundown of what needs to be in a sales letter.  This is not exhaustive, meaning there may be other things that you might want to include.

I will give you an example of a sales letter, when you’re finished taking this in, you can rewrite it and make it your own.

Here’s what I like to do at the beginning of the sales letter:  I like to introduce the problem that people have.  Some people may do it the opposite way and start with the solution.  I really like to start with the problem as it flows better with everything else that I do.

Everything that I do is a filtering system, the articles that I do only have the people with problems that I can help them with.  My email has a filtering system that only has people that will buy things from me that they need.  The same thing with coaching, I only want to work with people that have very specific needs.  I have filters that I use to screen people into my coaching.  I do this same thing in my sales letter.  It works really well for me and really well for people that master this.

So, start off the letter with their problem, “Do you have a problem with XYZ..?””  “Are you struggling with XYZ…?”  I may even go into an entire paragraph about somebody and what they’re frustrated with.

What happens here?  I take the chance of losing people that don’t have that problem.  But that’s okay with me because they don’t need the product anyway.  I would much rather only have people read my sales letter that are in need of what I am offering.  The next thing that I would do is either go into an “I’ve been there done that”, or I would introduce myself and describe the solution to their problem.  So I would do one of these two things, it does not have to be yes one or yes the other.  You can do this either or and it will work.

What I generally do is I come in and tell a story about myself.  “I’ve been through what you’ve been through, this is what it felt like….” I’ll write a paragraph about how I felt when I had that problem, I’ll explain that I was frustrated with it.  Then I’ll write a paragraph about how I’ve overcome that problem.  I’m simply connecting with them and their problem, I like to have them connect with me.  Again, they’re only going to connect if we can help them with a problem.

Then what I am going to do is say, “As a result that I can overcome this, I would like to make it easy for people like you that haven’t had their breakthrough yet, to make the breakthrough easy.”  “So you don’t have to bang your head against the wall, here is the solution I will give you.”  “The solution is my XYZ (insert whichever program you have).”

I will include a rundown of what I am going to help them with, or help them fix.  I will then tell you either how it’s composed (3 hours, 20 pages, etc.), I will list what it is.  I like this section to be really short; they’re not buying 8 CD’s, they’re not buying 20 pages.  The only reason I include it is, if I don’t, I get emails that ask me, “How many hours of content is this?”  Because there are some people that evaluate a product by how many hours are in it not what it will do for them.

Sometimes I make it just a one liner.  You’’ll find some peoples sales letters that are paragraph after paragraph telling you all of the things that you’re going to receive in it.  Personally, I believe that’s a mistake.  I believe the only time that it’s not is when you’’re giving them like 25 different things and in each one of those things, you’re talking about the benefit.

What I then generally do is talk about the benefit, how your life will be different if you do this.   In addition to what the benefits are, I like to include what I call an imagine paragraph.  I like to tell them something like close their eyes and imagine how life would be if things were different.  We’ll talk about how their life would be after they use the product.  I like to include that, not everybody does, but I do.

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