How to Launch Products Multiple Times Without Burning Out your List

by Kristen Burgess
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Product launches bring dependable, regular income into your business – if you do them regularly!  Let’s look at some strategies to launch your products regularly while keeping goodwill with your list:

With your first launch some people trusted you enough to buy – let’s say you’re just getting started with your list of 100 subscribers, and you made 2 sales. 10 days later you do another launch and 2 more people trust you enough to buy, so you make 2 more sales.

Now you have 96 on your list who did not buy. What do you think you’re going to do in 10 more days? If you have a 3rd product, then you’re going to put your 3rd product in there.

What do you do if you don’t have a 3rd product? Could you go and resell the 1st one?

Yes, you could. Would the conversion rates be as good? No.

Will there be some issues with people receiving the same emails they received before? Yes.

Although there’s a place for running the same campaign repeatedly over time, you probably wouldn’t want to run it 20 days later. Just to throw a piece of advice out there.

But, now you’re beginning to get an idea of how this works.

You’re going to do credibility, knowledge, engagement and interaction and then a launch. Who buys? The people who trust you are the ones that buy. The ones that don’t buy go through another credibility, content, engagement, piece. After this, some of them trust you more and they’ll buy.

The ones that don’t go will go through another process and some of them will step up to the plate; now they’ll trust you and they’ll buy. This could go on for a year.

Hint: Keep Delivering Great Content

Some people may stay on your list a year before they buy. But, I want to say one thing about that: I think that statement becomes a little misleading, even deceptive.

If someone stays on my list long enough, sometimes they’ll buy in the long run.  So you don’t necessarily want to get rid of someone on your list if they’re clicking and reading.  Keep them if they’re active. If you don’t care too much about open rates, and you’re not worried with your autoresponder service and your deliverability, then you may never take anybody off your list.  People may stay on your list for a really long time and some people buy.

It’s really easy for us to say: “Because some people buy, let’s make all of your marketing targeted to the people that buy.” Instead, what you do is have all of your marketing upfront and when people are ready to buy, they do.  Keep those active subscribers.

Balancing Trust Building with Customer Need

When people first join your list, they’re at the biggest point of need. Their need is at its biggest point. Their need goes down from this point – lower every day that they’re on your list. Now their desire for their need probably goes down, but their trust level for you goes up.

Now at some point, there’s an intersection. If you were to graph this out you would have a downward sloping curve for need (and perceived need) and you would have an upward sloping curve for trust.

When both of these meet, that’s when they’ll buy. You’ll have more people that have more need early on in your campaign.

If you look at this mathematically, it would be the shaded area. If you’re to have a downward sloping “need curve” and an upward sloping “trust curve,” then you shade the far area to the left and that would be the greater possibility that people might buy from you.

You can look at this from a few different perspectives.

I hope I have given you enough to realize that people need you the most early in your campaign. If you wait 9 months to present something to them, because you want their trust to be the highest, most of them don’t have the need anymore.  So what you want to do is focus on making sales early on and maximize the amount of people that trust you.  Then as people begin to trust you more in the future, you can re-run old campaigns.

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